April 17, 2014


refridgerator:

when you stay up all night doing hw and the teacher doesn’t collect it

image

274,893 notes
Reblog
text

Via pizza ✌

sanastark:

honestly i try not to judge people before i get to know them but if you hate sansa stark it’s a whole other ball game

(Source: sanastark)

693 notes
Reblog
text

Via stop this heartache overload

zubat:

frecklesshake:

we all have this one character death that we will never be over and fine with

221,247 notes
Reblog

Via I'm so glad you're here!

peashooter85:

Ancient Roman Nanotechnology —- The Lycurgus Cup
In the 1950’s the British Museum acquired one of the most amazing archaeological finds from Ancient Rome.  The Lycurgus Cup is a beautiful 1,600 year old goblet crafted from glass by the Ancient Romans.  The cup depicts the punishment of Lycurgus, a mythical king who was ensnared in vines for committing evil acts against the Greek god Dionysus.  The craftsmanship and artwork of the cup are certainly amazing on their own. During the age of the Roman Empire the Romans were master glassmakers, producing some of the finest pieces of glassware in history.   However the Lycurgus cup has one incredible property that goes far beyond traditional glassmaking.  When exposed to light, the cup turns from jade green into a bright, glowing red color.  For decades historians, archaeologists, and scientists had no idea why this occurred or how the Romans made the cup with such light changing properties.  Then in 1990 a small fragment of the cup was examined by scientists under a microscope.  What they discovered is truly amazing.
The Lycurgus cup is not only made of glass, but is impregnated with thousands of small particles of gold and silver.  Each of the gold and silver particles are less than 50 nano-meters in diameter, less than one-one thousandth the size of a grain of table salt.  When the cup is hit with light, electrons belonging to the metal flecks vibrate in ways that alter the color depending on the observer’s position.  What is even more amazing is that the addition of the particles to the glass was no accident or coincidence.  The Romans would have had to have known the exact mixture and density of particles needed to give the cup light changing properties.  This would have been done without the aid of a microscope, without the knowledge of atomic theory, and 1,300 years before Newton’s Theory of Colors.
Today the Lycurgus Cup has profound affects on modern nanotechnology.  After studying the cup, researchers and engineers are looking to adapt the technology for modern purposes.  A researcher from the University of Illinois named Gong Gang Liu is currently working on a device which uses the same technology to diagnose disease.  Another application of the technology is a possible device which can detect dangerous materials being smuggled onto airplanes by terrorists.  
The legacy of Ancient Rome continues.  Arena’s, baths, arches, and  nanotechnology. 

peashooter85:

Ancient Roman Nanotechnology —- The Lycurgus Cup

In the 1950’s the British Museum acquired one of the most amazing archaeological finds from Ancient Rome.  The Lycurgus Cup is a beautiful 1,600 year old goblet crafted from glass by the Ancient Romans.  The cup depicts the punishment of Lycurgus, a mythical king who was ensnared in vines for committing evil acts against the Greek god Dionysus.  The craftsmanship and artwork of the cup are certainly amazing on their own. During the age of the Roman Empire the Romans were master glassmakers, producing some of the finest pieces of glassware in history.   However the Lycurgus cup has one incredible property that goes far beyond traditional glassmaking.  When exposed to light, the cup turns from jade green into a bright, glowing red color.  For decades historians, archaeologists, and scientists had no idea why this occurred or how the Romans made the cup with such light changing properties.  Then in 1990 a small fragment of the cup was examined by scientists under a microscope.  What they discovered is truly amazing.

The Lycurgus cup is not only made of glass, but is impregnated with thousands of small particles of gold and silver.  Each of the gold and silver particles are less than 50 nano-meters in diameter, less than one-one thousandth the size of a grain of table salt.  When the cup is hit with light, electrons belonging to the metal flecks vibrate in ways that alter the color depending on the observer’s position.  What is even more amazing is that the addition of the particles to the glass was no accident or coincidence.  The Romans would have had to have known the exact mixture and density of particles needed to give the cup light changing properties.  This would have been done without the aid of a microscope, without the knowledge of atomic theory, and 1,300 years before Newton’s Theory of Colors.

Today the Lycurgus Cup has profound affects on modern nanotechnology.  After studying the cup, researchers and engineers are looking to adapt the technology for modern purposes.  A researcher from the University of Illinois named Gong Gang Liu is currently working on a device which uses the same technology to diagnose disease.  Another application of the technology is a possible device which can detect dangerous materials being smuggled onto airplanes by terrorists.  

The legacy of Ancient Rome continues.  Arena’s, baths, arches, and  nanotechnology. 

(Source: smithsonianmag.com)

828 notes
Reblog

April 16, 2014


sadish-teen:

Tattooed Tears // The Front Bottoms

sadish-teen:

Tattooed Tears // The Front Bottoms

1,918 notes
Reblog

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.

Anthony Mackie reinforcing his position as my favourite person in the world 

380 notes
Reblog

lgbbq:

The farther away from valentines day it gets the funnier it is

lgbbq:

The farther away from valentines day it gets the funnier it is

(Source: handsthatthieve)

347,313 notes
Reblog

sharpmarbles:

Andrei Tarkovsky’s “STALKER” (1979)

6,063 notes
Reblog
l

We forget we’re
mostly water
till the rain falls
and every atom
in our body
starts to go home.

Albert Huffstickler (via aestheticintrovert)

(Source: paperbackwords)

6,972 notes
Reblog

dr-watsons-lover:

iampox:

Ten pictures that will make you love advertising

This right here is what advertising should be. Not sexualizing men and women. Just clever little things like this.

244,165 notes
Reblog

on my honor as a Stark.

(Source: cathly)

9,028 notes
Reblog

hobbitofthemotherfuckinshire:

If Game of Thrones has taught me anything it’s Kings are fucking weak and don’t mess with a Queen

19,661 notes
Reblog
text

Via endure and survive